The Meaning of Positive Feng Shui and How To Achieve It

 

Many of us have stumbled across the term Feng Shui. What are the principles of Feng Shui? Is it a feeling? Is it a look? What’s the deeper meaning?

The definition of Feng Shui

When we google the term the definition is as follows: “(in Chinese) a system of laws considered to govern spatial arrangement and orientation in relation to the flow of energy (chi), and whose favourable or unfavourable effects are taken into account when siting and designing buildings.”

The meaning of the word(s) Feng Shui

The words “Feng Shui” refers to “wind” (Feng) and “water” (Shui), which are both natural, flowing elements of the earth.

History

Feng Shui can be traced back thousands of years. It is a Chinese system and discipline that focuses on living in positive harmony with your surroundings through the way you organize your objects. Initially, it was created as a method for selecting the safest burial for families and relatives. This site had to be specifically selected and evaluated. The importance of picking a tombstone lay in finding a place of hope that could be harnessed for the descendants.

Understanding Feng Shui In Your Home Or Office 

Your environment determines your psychological well-being. Colours and the arrangement of objects and furniture influences the flow of your space and mood. For instance, a pigsty of a space surrounding you might affect your productivity and mood, thus it contributes to the “Feng Shui” of your space. Maybe if you recreated your space-plan, the Feng Shui would contribute more positively, and it will be easier to keep tidy. Get the idea?

How to Achieve Positive Feng Shui

The best way to achieve positive Feng Shui is by arranging your furniture practically to ensure an optimistic flow throughout your house. Here are some tips to keep in mind for a better Feng Shui:

The Front door

The front door plays a very important role in the practice of Feng Shui as this is the portal where energy enters. Be sure that the area walking up to the door and the area behind the door is clean and open. A rug or chandelier shining light in the hallway would add the perfect welcoming element to the entrance of your house.

Steer Clear of Clutter

Clearing up clutter will let energy comfortably flow through your house instead of unnecessary objects blocking it. Remember that rooms such as the garage or attic should also be cleaned up so that ALL of your surroundings have a spacious, open feel. It will definitely contribute to the broad-spectrum.

Balance the Elements  

Feng Shui has got five elements, namely: Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal and Water. It is recommended to use some or all of these elements to enhance your way of living. Keep in mind that you don’t have to incorporate these elements to its literal extent. The colour green can symbolise earth, while the water of flowers in a vase is more than enough to portray water.

Expand Natural Light

When light shines through an open window or portal it is considered an energy boost in Feng Shui. If there is a lot of natural light coming in, the room will feel brighter, bigger, and fresher. Do not neglect your artificial lighting –   a very important role in the overall quality of your home energy.

Bathroom Door Closed 

It is believed that a closed bathroom door is one of the rules of positive Feng Shui. This is where the water goes out of the house and it is seen as a private space. Always keep the bathroom fresh and tidy for others when they must enter.

Clean Windows 

Clean your windows regularly – it will lighten and brighten your space! Dirty windows will make your space feel more cramped up and stuffy.

Plants 

If you do a little bit of Pinteresting on Feng Shui you will see that plants are a favourite in Feng Shui because it is part of the five elements. You get air-purifying plants such as Dracaena Janet Craig, Lady Palm, Areca Palm, Rubber Plant and more. Look up some articles on air-purifying plants.

Finally, a quote by the father of Western Philosophy: “The secret of change is to focus all your energy not on fighting the old but on building the new.” – Socrates